Author

Max Nesterak

Max Nesterak

Max Nesterak is the deputy editor of the Reformer and reports on labor and housing. Most recently he was an associate producer for Minnesota Public Radio after a stint at NPR. He also co-founded the Behavioral Scientist and was a Fulbright Scholar to Berlin, Germany.

Minnesotan wins national fellowship to teach Indigenous birthing practices

By: - January 22, 2020

Dorene Day, an Ojibwe midwife, was one of 10 Indigenous people from across the country selected for a $50,000 fellowship, which she’ll use to continue her work teaching Indigenous birthing practices.

Minneapolis council member tries for top job at Housing Authority

By: - January 21, 2020

City Council Member Abdi Warsame, Ward 6, is interviewing for the top job at the Minneapolis Public Housing Authority, according to a staff member in Warsame’s office.  If offered the position, Warsame would not be able to keep his seat on the council. His current term doesn’t end until 2022, so he would need to […]

Minneapolis Council Members want to ban fur coat sales

By: - January 17, 2020

Minneapolis City Council Members Alondra Cano and Cam Gordon announced today they plan to introduce an ordinance that would ban the sale and manufacture of new animal fur products. The proposed fur ban would threaten the business of one of the largest fur retailers in the United States, Ribnick Fur & Leather, which was founded […]

Beltrami County refugee vote hypocritical, commissioner says

By: - January 15, 2020

When Beltrami County became the first local government in Minnesota to refuse to accept new refugees under President Donald Trump’s executive order, one county commissioner noted the irony and hypocrisy of the vote.  Commissioner Tim Sumner, a member of the Red Lake Nation, told the Star Tribune, “A lot of people that migrated here are […]

Brentton Holzer and his mother Stacie Zamora

The most in demand jobs in Minnesota don’t pay enough to live here

By: - January 14, 2020

Of the 10 most in-demand jobs in Minnesota right now, only half pay the $15 an hour needed to meet the basic costs of living in the state.  And that’s assuming you’re single, with no kids or anyone else to support, don’t have student debt, can find a cheaper-than-average home, and can get 40 hours […]

Nope, that’s not how that government program works

By: - January 13, 2020

Everyone who qualifies for it can get it.